2013-02-09

Porn - and my teen brain

TED talk on porn - often I wish that I actually like porn - it might make me feel more like a normal person.

I actually prefer more general sources of novelty - information in general. Hence you find me, under my ideal preference, switching jobs pretty frequently. I figure out operations by watching the activities of people around me and usually have run out of things that they will actually let me do within a few months. Also refer to my academic interests on about.me/jerng and you'll see where my wires got crossed. :P

I was in student / religious leadership roles from the age of 12, and by the time I was 14, I had pretty much gotten bored of people. PEOPLE had ceased to be novel (maybe because I was mostly dealing with 14-year-olds). Working rooms for contacts, doing phone-call-downs to organise events, and talking people through their emotional concerns into a calmer state of mind, were pretty much becoming a routine. So at the time my brain was probably being maximally rewired, from the ages of 15 to 17, I was pretty much focused on learning about the humanities and the arts, as I had been under the impression that that category of information was somewhat lacking in my Malaysian education environment.

Oh, at the same time, though I'd been interested in math and the natural science since an introduction to hypothesis testing at the age of 8, and with related metaphysical ideas such as transcendental idealism (TI).
TI was via Kant's COPR, sufficiently communicated in Sophie's World, which a teacher had recommended when I was 14; later I confirmed that Kant, of course, was merely the first person in the European tradition to document this observation about the systematic limitations of consciousness.
But at the same time that I was making the transition noted in the previous paragraph, I was pretty much fed up with the way the education ministry had structured our syllabi, and consequently with the way that teachers were teaching math and science. Evidently this too has become a long-term interest.

I guess it's great to track down a systematic observation about why I am who I am. :)

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